Osaka

From Kyoto, it’s only about a 45-minute train ride to Osaka. After arriving in Osaka and getting a bite to eat, we headed to Osaka Bay. The bay area is full of new developments on man-made islands. We rode the Tempozan Giant Ferris Wheel to get a birds-eye view of the bay. From the top of the wheel, you get a sense of expansiveness of the bay. The wheel also provides nice views of the various bridges that connect the bay. 

tempozan giant ferris wheel

tempozan giant ferris wheel

on the wheel

on the wheel

over osaka bay

over osaka bay

tempozan ohashi bridge in the osaka bay

tempozan ohashi bridge in the osaka bay

osaka bay

osaka bay

minato bridge, a double-deck bridge in the osaka bay

minato bridge, a double-deck bridge in the osaka bay

Next to the ferris wheel is the Osaka Aquarium, touted as one of the best in the world. We decided it was a must-see.

view of the aquarium from the ferris wheel

view of the aquarium from the ferris wheel

The aquarium is an 8-story building with enormous tanks that run from top to bottom, through all 8 floors. You start by taking an escalator all the way up to the 8th floor. You then tour the aquarium by winding your way down a ramp that circles all the way down to the first floor. As you make your way down the winding ramp, you are surrounded by continuous glass tanks. It’s fascinating because it simulates scuba diving…you start just above the water’s surface and make your way down to the deep sea. As you walk along each level, you move through different oceans/regions which each contain their own unique species.

picarucu

picarucu

feeding time for the penguins

feeding time for the penguins

The stars of the aquarium are the two whale sharks. We were able to see them during feeding time. A man fully outfitted in diving gear actually got into the tank to feed them.

whale sharks

whale sharks

The acrylic glass used at the aquarium is 30 centimeters thick. A sample piece on display provides a good perspective on its thickness. Over 300 tons of the glass are used at the aquarium.

the thick acrylic glass used at the aquarium

the thick acrylic glass used at the aquarium

At the end of the aquarium tour is a petting tank where you can touch stingrays and sand sharks. The stingrays felt like velvet and the sand sharks felt like sandpaper.

touching the stingrays

touching the stingrays

smooth like velvet

smooth like velvet

After leaving the aquarium, we stayed in the bay area to watch the sunset.

it was super windy

it was super windy

watching the sunset over Osaka bay

watching the sunset over osaka bay

there it goes

there it goes

After sunset, we headed to Namba (the south end of downtown Osaka). Herein lies Dotonbori, Osaka’s most famous district that glitters like Times Square. The landmark neon sign is the Glico runner crossing the finish line. I tried my best to impersonate.

dotonbori

dotonbori

glico runner

glico runner

glico runner impersonation

glico runner impersonation

dotonbori parking :)

dotonbori parking lot 🙂

never a lack of places to shop in japan

never a lack of places to shop in japan

a whole shop with just bear claw machines?!?

a whole shop with just bear claw machines?!?

For dinner that night, we headed to a sushi bar – literally, a restaurant with just one long bar – sushi chefs on one side and patrons on the other. You order sushi directly from the chefs. We noticed that most people would order one or two things at a time and keep on ordering until they had enough. Dealing with the language barrier, we decided to just order everything at once. Once you order, the chef places a flat plate with sliced ginger in front of each person. That plate is where he places the sushi as soon as he finishes making it.

sushi bar

sushi bar

sushi plate

sushi plate (note aquarium in background)

The sushi was the best tasting, freshest sushi we had ever had. And talk about fresh…we sat by the aquarium where chefs were pulling live creatures out of the tank as they worked. One important note…in Japan, they don’t give you the wasabi on the side – the chefs put it directly on the sushi. Which means the level of heat is at the discretion of the chef. I think our chef was having a little fun with us on our first set because it was so spicy my whole sinus track was instantly on fire. Even Jay’s eyes were watering and he likes his food super spicy. Thankfully, it was just that first set that was over the top hot. My personal favorites that night were the spicy tuna roll and the shrimp tempura roll. Nigiri and shishimi style are definitely more popular among the locals, but I prefer rolls.

our sushi chef

our sushi chef

watching the chefs at work

watching the chefs at work

spicy tuna roll

spicy tuna roll

shrimp tempura roll

shrimp tempura roll

In Osaka, we stayed in a “capsule” hotel. You literary sleep in an individual capsule. This style of accommodation was developed in Japan and has not gained popularity outside the country, making it a uniquely Japanese experience. The first capsule hotel to open was in 1979, in Osaka. Most capsule hotels are for men only, but there are some that have floors for women.

capsule hotel sign

capsule hotel sign

In Japan, it’s customary to remove your shoes when entering a home or hotel. Upon check-in at the capsule hotel, they give you a key which opens two lockers – one in the lobby for your shoes and a second one on your capsule floor. The locker on the capsule floor contains a robe, slippers, towel, and toothbrush with toothpaste (shared bathrooms & showers on each floor). I was on a secured women’s floor; Jay was two floors up on a men’s floor. Each person is assigned a capsule. It has just enough room for sleeping…a bit tight if you’re over 6 ft tall. There is a screen at the end of the capsule that you can pull down for privacy. Overall, it was a fun experience, but not that comfortable to sleep in, so I wouldn’t recommend it for more than one night.

women only floor

secured women only floor

personal locker on capsule floor

personal locker on capsule floor

capsules

capsules

looking into the capsule

looking into the capsule

a bit tight if you're 6' 3"

the capsule is a bit tight if you’re 6′ 3″

10 responses to “Osaka

  1. Not a big sushi fan but I the tuna looked good. That ferris wheel makes the London eye take a back seat.
    The sleeping tubes look like something out of a spaceship film.

    • What a great day and night you had. Ferris Wheel, beautiful sunset, sushi bar, capsule hotel. What great experiences you are enjoying. And your journey is only one week along.

  2. I have to admit the food did look good, but I’m not for sushi so I would have been pretty hungry where you ate. Not sure I could have slept in a capsule either. The pictures were spectacular again.

  3. woah….cool sites! That aquarium seems like an awesome place to visit. The sleeping capsules are not for those with phobias of small places….a little creepy too….too much like a morgue…haha! Glad your trip is going good so far……….oh ya…..I almost forgot….just say NO to sushi….LOL!!! 😉

  4. Thank you all for following the blog. We have truly enjoyed the Japanese food. Jay likes it as much as Thai food – which says a lot. Jennifer…yes, the capsules are not for the claustrophobic…LOL about your reference to a morgue, thankfully it didn’t feel creepy like that.

  5. I didn’t think I could sleep in that capsule until I saw the view of jays legs, looks like a camper so maybe I could, would love to try someday! And the sushi!!! Wow! Yum yum yum!!

  6. I think the capsule hotel is a fantastic idea and an experience I would have had to try. I am wondering how common it is (vs. traditional hotel). Looks as if it would be an inexpensive way for sleeping accommodations and I would prefer this to camping in a heartbeat! I have always kept a journal when we travel so I know sometimes you have to force yourself to do it at the end of the day, but it’s so worthwhile to have later and great for us to get to go along with you. (It’s really appreciated!) I am so looking forward to seeing photos of your travels in the Philippines. You must take a tricycle cab while there (if you can figure out how to fit Jay’s legs in it). At least one Jeepney too! Apparently, Cebu is still not very good (according to my friend’s family who lives there).

  7. Thanks for all the amazing pictures and details to describe your journey! I feel like I get to go with you guys and I enjoy hearing about all the different cultures. The capsule hotel is so interesting, definitely one night would be enough for me!

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